Poison Ivy 
Toxicodendron radicans
Image by Chris Evans

Fruit of Eastern poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans)

Eastern poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans)

Poison Ivy 
Toxicodendron radicans
Image by Paul Wray

70% of the U.S. population is sensitive to poison ivy.

Eastern Poison Ivy 
Toxicodendron radicans
Image by Steve Dewey

Eastern poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans)

Poison Ivy 
Toxicodendron radicans

Eastern poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans)

Poison Ivy

Poison Ivy is a plant that grows as a vine or shrub that produces the oil urushiol, which causes an ichy and sometimes painful rash on most people who come in contact with it. It is expected to become more widespread in Central New York as a result of global climate change.


Resources

Poison Ivy, Poison Oak, and Poison Sumac for Trainers and Supervisors - This fact sheet from The Ohio State University Extension covers how to identify and treat reactions to poisonous plants found while working, plus a 5-question true/false quiz for workers and an answer key.

Poison Ivy Factsheet -Learn how Eastern poison ivy sensitizes a person's skin, its distribution, habitat and controls, in this fact sheet from the University of Connecticut College of Agriculture & Natural Resources.

Consumer Horticulture: Poison Ivy from Purdue Extension, describes how to identify poison ivy, and offers treatment and control options.

FDA Outsmarting Poison Ivy and Other Poisonous Plant - This page on the U.S. Food & Drug Administration website covers how to recognize poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac, tips for avoiding contact, how to treat an exposure, and when to see a doctor.

USDA – Plant Profile- See a map of Eastern poison ivy distribution on the USDA Natural Resources Conservation website.

Last updated July 9, 2019